Exeter Student Friendly pub The pinhoe Hoard Exeter

We found a great Student Friendly pub to celebrate end of term.

WE’RE HERE TO KEEP YOU SAFE

While we’re both excited and pleased at the easing of restrictions from Monday 19th July, we wanted to reassure you that we are proceeding with caution and that your safety and enjoyment remain our number one priority.

We’ll continue to provide hand sanitiser, keep our pub well ventilated, health screen our team members and undertake enhanced hygiene and cleaning routines. Though guests and our team members no longer have to wear face coverings, do wear one if you feel more comfortable doing so.

There are also no longer any restrictions on group booking sizes but if you can’t book a table online, please contact us directly. NHS Track and Trace will also remain in place if you wish to check in when you arrive. Look out for the QR code in pub.

Our team will be on hand to explain everything you need to know during your visit including how to order your food and drink.

ORDER TO YOUR TABLE

Ordering from your table, to your table couldn’t be easier. No need to queue at the bar, ordering is quick and easy and can be done in a few simple steps!

Check out our new menu below, make a note of your table number then simply follow the link below and order now!

You’ll receive the same great pub service, without the need to stand at the bar – Makes Sense!

ORDER AT TABLE

 

 

https://www.pinhoehoardpubexeter.co.uk/latest-info/

https://www.pinhoehoardpubexeter.co.uk/menus/

 

quarantine for Exeter students returning from outside the UK

Reminder: Mandatory quarantine for students returning from outside the UK

student at airportFor students who are intending to return to the UK, since 15 February, everyone entering England from outside the Common Travel Area (Ireland, the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man) must:

  • quarantine for 10 days
  • take a coronavirus (COVID-19) test on day 2 and day 8 of quarantining
  • follow the national restrictions

Please note that you cannot currently enter the UK if you’ve been in or through a country on the banned travel list (sometimes known as the ‘red list’) in the last 10 days, unless you’re British, Irish or you have have residence rights in the UK.

Before you travel

Before travelling you must:

  • take a COVID-19 test and get a negative result during the 3 days before you travel
  • book and pay for a travel test package, which will include COVID-19 tests to be taken on or before day 2 and on or after day 8 of your quarantine
  • complete a passenger locator form with details of where you will home quarantine when you arrive and the travel test package (if you are arriving from a non red-list country) booking reference number

Quarantine for 10 days after you arrive

When you arrive in the UK, you must travel directly to the place you’re staying. You should only use public transport if you have no other option.

The 10 day quarantine period is continuous from the day you arrive in England. You must quarantine in one place for the full quarantine period, where you can have food and other necessities delivered. You must quarantine at the address you provided on the passenger locator form.

This period is necessary because it can take up to 10 days for COVID-19 symptoms to appear. You can find more information on the government’s website

If you’re travelling to England from or through a country on the banned travel list you will need to book a place in a quarantine hotel and arrange coronavirus (COVID-19) tests. This option is only available to those who are British, Irish or you have the right to live in the UK (This includes those holding a Student Visa but NOT a visitor visa).

Ending your quarantine early: Test to Release

You can use the Test to Release for international travel scheme if you have not been in or through any country that is on the travel ban red list in the 10 days before you arrive in England.

The scheme lets you choose to pay for a private COVID-19 test. If the result is negative, you can stop quarantining. You cannot take a test to release test until you have been in England for 5 full days.

For more on information on the mandatory quarantine requirements see the Government webpages or the latest updates from our International Advice and Guidance team.

Beware of scams

Beware of scams

Unfortunately, some criminals try to get money from students, particularly our international students. Some of these scams will be very authentic and persuasive and it can be frightening. Please don’t give out any personal details, especially banking details.

Examples of recent scams that have targeted our students include:

 

  1. An international student received a hoax phone call from someone claiming to be from the Home Office and was asked to share personal details.
  2. A student gave away their email login details through responding to a phishing email. A few months later, their email account had been hijacked and the hijacker impersonated the University to request the student pay tuition fee deposits.
  3. Committee members of a student society have been targeted with threatening Whatsapp messages.

 

If you’re contacted by someone and it seems unusual, unexpected or just odd, please end the call/communication. You should then contact your Info Point who can offer you advice on what to do next. If the person who contacted you is genuine they won’t mind you checking this and then getting back to them.

Find out more about keeping safe online.

We also have some specific guidance on protecting yourself on social media.

 

Read more University News

Exeter Uni The April/May 2021 examination period will take place online

Examinations and Assessments

The April/May 2021 examination period will take place online. Please review the information available on this webpage for details on the format online examinations take. 

Keep an eye on both your University emails and the student newsletter University Updates for information and guidance.

You can find some frequently asked questions on examinations here. For general questions on COVID-19, including accommodation, absence and self-isolation, please visit these pages.

Studyzone

Student Services are available to support you as you prepare for exams and assessments. Please access the Study Zone for guidance and support on revising and undertaking your examinations.

You can now view your examination timetable at mytimetable.exeter.ac.uk.

Your examination will take one of three forms:

  • Option 1.
    An open-book non-invigilated examination that must be completed and submitted within a 24 hour period following the examination start time written on your paper and on your examination timetable.You can use as much of the available 24 hours as you wish, but we do not expect the paper to take the full 24 hours to complete. An indicative amount of time, and/or a maximum word count(s), will be stipulated in the examination rubric, and on your exam timetable.

    Students will need to download, complete, and upload/submit their paper within the specified 24 hour period.

  • Option 2.
    An open-book non-invigilated examination that must be completed and submitted within a fixed duration during a specified 24 hour period as defined on your paper and on your examination timetable.As soon as you begin the download of your examination paper it will be time stamped, and the fixed duration of the examination will begin.

    The duration will be adjusted, where appropriate, with respect to Individual Learning Plans.

    Students are allowed an additional 30 minute window where submission is to BART. If your Option 2 paper must be submitted through BART (not submitted directly within ELE), please ensure you use the 30 minute window at the end of the fixed duration to upload and submit your work, contacting the Assessment Helpdesk should you have any problems during the examination.

    Students will need to download, complete, and upload/submit their paper within the fixed duration and the specified 24 hour period.

    It is your responsibility to note the time you access your Option 2 examination paper, and keep track of when you will need to submit.

  • Option 3.
    An extended non-invigilated examination normally to be taken over a number of weeks. Option 3 extended examinations are designed to be manageable alongside other time pressures, including other assessments.Please be aware, during the April/May assessment period you will not be able to apply for an extension to an option 3 extended examination. This is because option 3 assessments are still to be treated as examinations. Therefore students will have to apply to defer should they not be able to complete the assessment in the allocated weeks.

All Option 1 and 2 exam papers will be posted to Exams ELE, a platform for open book remote examinations. We will post a link to Exams ELE closer to the start of the exam period.

Option 3 extended examinations will be released on ELE, which you can find here. You can also access your course and revision materials on ELE.

Contact the Assessment Helpdesk

From Monday 26 April: examshelp@exeter.ac.uk or for an urgent request during an examination on the phone line: +44 (0)1392 72 6800

Exeter students set up walking group to promote women’s safety in the city

Following the recent tragic news of Sarah Everard’s murder and the two sexual assaults which have taken place on campus this month, there have been many protests and pushes to improve women’s safety around the country and on campus. Two Exeter uni students have gone the extra mile to create an online community which promoting women’s safety around the city as “we are stronger and safer together.”

Urban Angels Exeter was founded about a month ago by Exeter grad Talisker Alcobia Cornford, 21. With over 1,500 members already, it was the first community to launch, and since then similar groups have been set up in Birmingham, Cardiff, Portsmouth and Brighton. Talisker said: “The aim of Urban Angels is to provide a space for women to share alerts of anything potentially dangerous they experience in Exeter, a space for women to share their experiences and seek solidarity and support, and a place to share ideas, tips and set up initiatives that make the city safer for us.” The community is building a strong support network for women, to support other women.

In light of Sarah Everard’s murder and the statistic that 97% of young women have experienced a form of sexual harassment from men, women around the country have been reminded of how unsafe it can be to walk alone. Talisker told the Exeter Tab: “My idea for the group came from the desire to make UK cities safer for women. I feel immensely passionate about women’s safety, it is ridiculous that women have to fear for their safety when walking alone and that many of the actions we have to take become the norm for us.”

 

Help end Homelessness in Exeter

Help end Homelessness in Exeter

Published: 11 March 2021

Help end Homelessness in Exeter  Help end Homelessness in Exeter

Are you working with people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness?

If you are then we want to hear from you!

Exeter City Council is launching a new protocol for statutory and voluntary organizations to easily refer individuals or families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness to get the help they need.

To make a referral you will need to do the following:

  • have consent for the referral from the individual;
  • allow the individual to identify the housing authority in England which they would like the notification to be made to;
  • have consent from the individual that their contact details can be supplied so the housing authority can contact them regarding the referral;
  • provide us with the name, address (where known), contact information, and any other relevant details you wish to share.

If the service user is at risk of homelessness but is currently in accommodation, a prevention duty may be owed regardless of whether they have local connection to Exeter – see local connection information for more details.

If you wish to send supporting information or evidence that you feel may be helpful to assess your service users’ needs, you can do so using the upload facility in the online referral form.

We aim to respond to all inquiries within one working day and it should take no longer than 5 minutes to complete a referral!


I’m not a professional, how can I help someone who is homeless or at risk of homelessness?

If you’re not a professional, you can use our online form to contact us for housing and homelessness advice. This forms gives you the option to complete a form for someone else, just remember that you will need their consent to do this. Alternatively, you can contact us at 01392 265726 / housing.advice@exeter.gov.uk

Exeter subject success in influential league rankings

We’re delighted that our subjects from across disciplines have been recognised as being amongst the very best in the world, according to the latest influential global league table.
Sixteen subjects are now positioned in the world’s top 100 – with six in the top 50 – in the latest QS World University Subject Rankings, published on Wednesday March 3rd, 2021.
Building on the success of previous years, Mining Engineering has risen into the top 10, ranked 8th this year, Sports-related subjects (13th) retains its place in the top 20, while Geography rose six places to 15th.
Elsewhere Environmental Sciences (43rd), History (46th) and Geophysics (47th) all feature in the elite Top 50 grouping.
May be an image of outdoors

Exeter WW2 bomb: 2,600 homes evacuated around Exeter Uni

Exeter WW2 bomb: 2,600 homes evacuated

Published
Related Topics

Exeter bomb. Pic: Devon and Cornwall PoliceIMAGE COPYRIGHTDEVON AND CORNWALL POLICE
image captionPolice said they were expecting “a big bang” when the bomb was rendered safe in a controlled detonation

More than 2,600 households have been evacuated after an unexploded World War Two bomb was found in Exeter.

Officers were called to University of Exeter halls of residence on Glenthorne Road at about 09:20 GMT on Friday and declared a major incident.

More than 1,400 students were evacuated from 12 halls of residence after the explosive was found.

Devon and Cornwall Police said work was under way “for the controlled detonation of the device”.

On Twitter, the university said the device was discovered by “builders on private land” next to the Streatham campus.

An initial cordon of 330ft (100m) was extended to 1,310ft (400m) on Saturday morning and people in about 2,600 households have been told to move.

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.View original tweet on Twitter

Bomb disposal experts started examining the device at about 10:00 GMT on Saturday to decide how to deal with it.

The explosive device is estimated to be about 8ft long (2.5m).

Police said a bomb disposal team “worked through the night to establish a walled mitigation structure”.

Ch Insp Steve Alexander, of Devon and Cornwall Police, said the mitigation “box” was made using 400 tonnes of sand and “at some point today, all being well, there should be a big bang which will render this device safe”.

He said: “It’s reasonable to expect this bang will be heard quite a distance across Exeter, and it will be important for people not to report it to us as an incident as we are aware of what it is.

He also said anyone not asked to leave their homes should stay to comply with coronavirus lockdown rules.

Road closed at Exeter bomb scene
image captionPolice declared a major incident at the scene on Glenthorne Road

The BBC’s John Ayres said there had been “unusual scenes” of “hundreds of students with suitcases, all marching down the street towards St David’s [railway] Station, away from the university and finding somewhere to go”.

One student, Lucy, told the BBC she was in a hall just over 330ft (100m) away from the scene when she and neighbours were told to leave at about 18:00 on Friday, given dinner and moved to hotels.

She said: “We’ve been told we’ll be staying here until Sunday.”

She added: “I didn’t think it was that big a deal until I realised how big it was and how people were taking it so seriously.”

The university said it would “support those who are affected until the situation is resolved and buildings are reopened”.

It said: “We will communicate directly later today by email with those students who have been relocated.”

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.View original tweet on Twitter

The university said on Friday night it could not say exactly how many students were moved as “obviously many students are not back on campus because of the Covid-19 situation”.

Exeter students being moved from halls
image captionStudents who were moved from the halls have been told they be in hotels until Sunday

Coastguard rescue officers, volunteers from Dartmoor Search and Rescue and members of disaster response charity Re:Act were among workers helping with the evacuation.

Re:Act said the evacuations were completed by about 11:00.

Devon County Council and Exeter City Council staff had been working to “support those in private residences to find alternative accommodation, providing support to those who are particularly at-risk or vulnerable”, police said.

The majority were “staying with family or friends”, officers added.

Roads have been closed in the area and city rail services disrupted as a result of the discovery.

The city was heavily attacked by German bombers in 19 raids during World War Two, particularly in May 1942 during the Baedecker Raids.

presentational grey line

Follow BBC News South West on TwitterFacebook and Instagram. Send your story ideas to spotlight@bbc.co.uk.

Related Topics

More on this story

  • Twelve student halls evacuated over WW2 bomb

    Published18 hours ago

Related Internet Links

  • University of Exeter

  • Southern Diving Group – Royal Navy

  • Devon and Cornwall Police

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

The University of Exeter has extended the cancellation of rent across all of its accommodation after being advised by the Department of Education that educational settings cannot reopen until 8 March at the earliest. Students who have not returned to their university-managed accommodation between 4 January and 8 March will not be liable to pay rent for that period. The provision is also in place for students whose accommodation contracts have been organised by the university. Students’ Guild President Sunday Blake has said that the Guild will “still be pushing for a system where all students will get 100 per cent rent refunds”. Students in privately-owned UNITE accommodation had originally been told that their rent would be reduced by 50 per cent between 18 January and 14 February, as long as they did not return to their accommodation during this time. This has now also been extended to 8 March, in line with the government’s advice. The vast majority of students in privately rented accommodation are still paying full rent regardless of whether they are currently living in their term-time homes. Students’ Guild President Sunday Blake has said that the Guild will “still be pushing for a system where all students will get 100 per cent rent refunds”.

The University of Exeter has extended the cancellation of rent across all of its accommodation after being advised by the Department of Education that educational settings cannot reopen until 8 March at the earliest.

Students who have not returned to their university-managed accommodation between 4 January and 8 March will not be liable to pay rent for that period.

The provision is also in place for students whose accommodation contracts have been organized by the university.

Students’ Guild President Sunday Blake has said that the Guild will “still be pushing for a system where all students will get 100 per cent rent refunds”.

Students in privately-owned UNITE accommodation had originally been told that their rent would be reduced by 50 percent between 18 January and 14 February, as long as they did not return to their accommodation during this time. This has now also been extended to 8 March, in line with the government’s advice.

The vast majority of students in privately rented accommodation are still paying full rent regardless of whether they are currently living in their term-time homes.

Students’ Guild President Sunday Blake has said that the Guild will “still be pushing for a system where all students will get 100 percent rent refunds”.

Is Exeter a good student city?

Is Exeter expensive for students?
Cost of living

It is estimated that a single student living in Exeter or Cornwall will need approximately £1015 a month to meet basic living expenses such as accommodation, food, books and equipment and other necessities.

How many students are in Exeter?
22,540 (2017)
Is Exeter expensive to live in?
A single person estimated monthly costs are 857$ (620£) without rent. … Exeter is 30.55% less expensive than New York (without rent). Rent in Exeter is, on average, 69.98% lower than in New York.

Is Exeter posh?
Exeter is well known for being somewhat of a preppy uni. Full of the Home Counties finest, shipped down to the South West every semester in daddies Range Rover, it is easy to think of Exeter as being one of the poshest establishments going.
Is Exeter dangerous?
I wouldn’t class any neighborhood as being dangerous in Exeter. … No city is totally safe, and nasty stuff still happens rarely, but Exeter is one of the safest cities I’ve lived in / visited.

 

The things you see on the road In Exeter    How much does a student need to live on a week?
The average student living costs are about £795 a month (or £183 a week), with our findings revealing that the Maintenance Loan often falls way short of covering students‘ living expenses. It’s probably no surprise that rent takes the biggest chunk out of the student budget.