Beware of scams

Beware of scams

Unfortunately, some criminals try to get money from students, particularly our international students. Some of these scams will be very authentic and persuasive and it can be frightening. Please don’t give out any personal details, especially banking details.

Examples of recent scams that have targeted our students include:

 

  1. An international student received a hoax phone call from someone claiming to be from the Home Office and was asked to share personal details.
  2. A student gave away their email login details through responding to a phishing email. A few months later, their email account had been hijacked and the hijacker impersonated the University to request the student pay tuition fee deposits.
  3. Committee members of a student society have been targeted with threatening Whatsapp messages.

 

If you’re contacted by someone and it seems unusual, unexpected or just odd, please end the call/communication. You should then contact your Info Point who can offer you advice on what to do next. If the person who contacted you is genuine they won’t mind you checking this and then getting back to them.

Find out more about keeping safe online.

We also have some specific guidance on protecting yourself on social media.

 

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Exeter Uni The April/May 2021 examination period will take place online

Examinations and Assessments

The April/May 2021 examination period will take place online. Please review the information available on this webpage for details on the format online examinations take. 

Keep an eye on both your University emails and the student newsletter University Updates for information and guidance.

You can find some frequently asked questions on examinations here. For general questions on COVID-19, including accommodation, absence and self-isolation, please visit these pages.

Studyzone

Student Services are available to support you as you prepare for exams and assessments. Please access the Study Zone for guidance and support on revising and undertaking your examinations.

You can now view your examination timetable at mytimetable.exeter.ac.uk.

Your examination will take one of three forms:

  • Option 1.
    An open-book non-invigilated examination that must be completed and submitted within a 24 hour period following the examination start time written on your paper and on your examination timetable.You can use as much of the available 24 hours as you wish, but we do not expect the paper to take the full 24 hours to complete. An indicative amount of time, and/or a maximum word count(s), will be stipulated in the examination rubric, and on your exam timetable.

    Students will need to download, complete, and upload/submit their paper within the specified 24 hour period.

  • Option 2.
    An open-book non-invigilated examination that must be completed and submitted within a fixed duration during a specified 24 hour period as defined on your paper and on your examination timetable.As soon as you begin the download of your examination paper it will be time stamped, and the fixed duration of the examination will begin.

    The duration will be adjusted, where appropriate, with respect to Individual Learning Plans.

    Students are allowed an additional 30 minute window where submission is to BART. If your Option 2 paper must be submitted through BART (not submitted directly within ELE), please ensure you use the 30 minute window at the end of the fixed duration to upload and submit your work, contacting the Assessment Helpdesk should you have any problems during the examination.

    Students will need to download, complete, and upload/submit their paper within the fixed duration and the specified 24 hour period.

    It is your responsibility to note the time you access your Option 2 examination paper, and keep track of when you will need to submit.

  • Option 3.
    An extended non-invigilated examination normally to be taken over a number of weeks. Option 3 extended examinations are designed to be manageable alongside other time pressures, including other assessments.Please be aware, during the April/May assessment period you will not be able to apply for an extension to an option 3 extended examination. This is because option 3 assessments are still to be treated as examinations. Therefore students will have to apply to defer should they not be able to complete the assessment in the allocated weeks.

All Option 1 and 2 exam papers will be posted to Exams ELE, a platform for open book remote examinations. We will post a link to Exams ELE closer to the start of the exam period.

Option 3 extended examinations will be released on ELE, which you can find here. You can also access your course and revision materials on ELE.

Contact the Assessment Helpdesk

From Monday 26 April: examshelp@exeter.ac.uk or for an urgent request during an examination on the phone line: +44 (0)1392 72 6800

Exeter students set up walking group to promote women’s safety in the city

Following the recent tragic news of Sarah Everard’s murder and the two sexual assaults which have taken place on campus this month, there have been many protests and pushes to improve women’s safety around the country and on campus. Two Exeter uni students have gone the extra mile to create an online community which promoting women’s safety around the city as “we are stronger and safer together.”

Urban Angels Exeter was founded about a month ago by Exeter grad Talisker Alcobia Cornford, 21. With over 1,500 members already, it was the first community to launch, and since then similar groups have been set up in Birmingham, Cardiff, Portsmouth and Brighton. Talisker said: “The aim of Urban Angels is to provide a space for women to share alerts of anything potentially dangerous they experience in Exeter, a space for women to share their experiences and seek solidarity and support, and a place to share ideas, tips and set up initiatives that make the city safer for us.” The community is building a strong support network for women, to support other women.

In light of Sarah Everard’s murder and the statistic that 97% of young women have experienced a form of sexual harassment from men, women around the country have been reminded of how unsafe it can be to walk alone. Talisker told the Exeter Tab: “My idea for the group came from the desire to make UK cities safer for women. I feel immensely passionate about women’s safety, it is ridiculous that women have to fear for their safety when walking alone and that many of the actions we have to take become the norm for us.”

 

Help end Homelessness in Exeter

Help end Homelessness in Exeter

Published: 11 March 2021

Help end Homelessness in Exeter  Help end Homelessness in Exeter

Are you working with people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness?

If you are then we want to hear from you!

Exeter City Council is launching a new protocol for statutory and voluntary organizations to easily refer individuals or families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness to get the help they need.

To make a referral you will need to do the following:

  • have consent for the referral from the individual;
  • allow the individual to identify the housing authority in England which they would like the notification to be made to;
  • have consent from the individual that their contact details can be supplied so the housing authority can contact them regarding the referral;
  • provide us with the name, address (where known), contact information, and any other relevant details you wish to share.

If the service user is at risk of homelessness but is currently in accommodation, a prevention duty may be owed regardless of whether they have local connection to Exeter – see local connection information for more details.

If you wish to send supporting information or evidence that you feel may be helpful to assess your service users’ needs, you can do so using the upload facility in the online referral form.

We aim to respond to all inquiries within one working day and it should take no longer than 5 minutes to complete a referral!


I’m not a professional, how can I help someone who is homeless or at risk of homelessness?

If you’re not a professional, you can use our online form to contact us for housing and homelessness advice. This forms gives you the option to complete a form for someone else, just remember that you will need their consent to do this. Alternatively, you can contact us at 01392 265726 / housing.advice@exeter.gov.uk

Exeter subject success in influential league rankings

We’re delighted that our subjects from across disciplines have been recognised as being amongst the very best in the world, according to the latest influential global league table.
Sixteen subjects are now positioned in the world’s top 100 – with six in the top 50 – in the latest QS World University Subject Rankings, published on Wednesday March 3rd, 2021.
Building on the success of previous years, Mining Engineering has risen into the top 10, ranked 8th this year, Sports-related subjects (13th) retains its place in the top 20, while Geography rose six places to 15th.
Elsewhere Environmental Sciences (43rd), History (46th) and Geophysics (47th) all feature in the elite Top 50 grouping.
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Exeter WW2 bomb: 2,600 homes evacuated around Exeter Uni

Exeter WW2 bomb: 2,600 homes evacuated

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Exeter bomb. Pic: Devon and Cornwall PoliceIMAGE COPYRIGHTDEVON AND CORNWALL POLICE
image captionPolice said they were expecting “a big bang” when the bomb was rendered safe in a controlled detonation

More than 2,600 households have been evacuated after an unexploded World War Two bomb was found in Exeter.

Officers were called to University of Exeter halls of residence on Glenthorne Road at about 09:20 GMT on Friday and declared a major incident.

More than 1,400 students were evacuated from 12 halls of residence after the explosive was found.

Devon and Cornwall Police said work was under way “for the controlled detonation of the device”.

On Twitter, the university said the device was discovered by “builders on private land” next to the Streatham campus.

An initial cordon of 330ft (100m) was extended to 1,310ft (400m) on Saturday morning and people in about 2,600 households have been told to move.

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.View original tweet on Twitter

Bomb disposal experts started examining the device at about 10:00 GMT on Saturday to decide how to deal with it.

The explosive device is estimated to be about 8ft long (2.5m).

Police said a bomb disposal team “worked through the night to establish a walled mitigation structure”.

Ch Insp Steve Alexander, of Devon and Cornwall Police, said the mitigation “box” was made using 400 tonnes of sand and “at some point today, all being well, there should be a big bang which will render this device safe”.

He said: “It’s reasonable to expect this bang will be heard quite a distance across Exeter, and it will be important for people not to report it to us as an incident as we are aware of what it is.

He also said anyone not asked to leave their homes should stay to comply with coronavirus lockdown rules.

Road closed at Exeter bomb scene
image captionPolice declared a major incident at the scene on Glenthorne Road

The BBC’s John Ayres said there had been “unusual scenes” of “hundreds of students with suitcases, all marching down the street towards St David’s [railway] Station, away from the university and finding somewhere to go”.

One student, Lucy, told the BBC she was in a hall just over 330ft (100m) away from the scene when she and neighbours were told to leave at about 18:00 on Friday, given dinner and moved to hotels.

She said: “We’ve been told we’ll be staying here until Sunday.”

She added: “I didn’t think it was that big a deal until I realised how big it was and how people were taking it so seriously.”

The university said it would “support those who are affected until the situation is resolved and buildings are reopened”.

It said: “We will communicate directly later today by email with those students who have been relocated.”

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.View original tweet on Twitter

The university said on Friday night it could not say exactly how many students were moved as “obviously many students are not back on campus because of the Covid-19 situation”.

Exeter students being moved from halls
image captionStudents who were moved from the halls have been told they be in hotels until Sunday

Coastguard rescue officers, volunteers from Dartmoor Search and Rescue and members of disaster response charity Re:Act were among workers helping with the evacuation.

Re:Act said the evacuations were completed by about 11:00.

Devon County Council and Exeter City Council staff had been working to “support those in private residences to find alternative accommodation, providing support to those who are particularly at-risk or vulnerable”, police said.

The majority were “staying with family or friends”, officers added.

Roads have been closed in the area and city rail services disrupted as a result of the discovery.

The city was heavily attacked by German bombers in 19 raids during World War Two, particularly in May 1942 during the Baedecker Raids.

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  • Twelve student halls evacuated over WW2 bomb

    Published18 hours ago

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The University of Exeter has extended the cancellation of rent across all of its accommodation after being advised by the Department of Education that educational settings cannot reopen until 8 March at the earliest. Students who have not returned to their university-managed accommodation between 4 January and 8 March will not be liable to pay rent for that period. The provision is also in place for students whose accommodation contracts have been organised by the university. Students’ Guild President Sunday Blake has said that the Guild will “still be pushing for a system where all students will get 100 per cent rent refunds”. Students in privately-owned UNITE accommodation had originally been told that their rent would be reduced by 50 per cent between 18 January and 14 February, as long as they did not return to their accommodation during this time. This has now also been extended to 8 March, in line with the government’s advice. The vast majority of students in privately rented accommodation are still paying full rent regardless of whether they are currently living in their term-time homes. Students’ Guild President Sunday Blake has said that the Guild will “still be pushing for a system where all students will get 100 per cent rent refunds”.

The University of Exeter has extended the cancellation of rent across all of its accommodation after being advised by the Department of Education that educational settings cannot reopen until 8 March at the earliest.

Students who have not returned to their university-managed accommodation between 4 January and 8 March will not be liable to pay rent for that period.

The provision is also in place for students whose accommodation contracts have been organized by the university.

Students’ Guild President Sunday Blake has said that the Guild will “still be pushing for a system where all students will get 100 per cent rent refunds”.

Students in privately-owned UNITE accommodation had originally been told that their rent would be reduced by 50 percent between 18 January and 14 February, as long as they did not return to their accommodation during this time. This has now also been extended to 8 March, in line with the government’s advice.

The vast majority of students in privately rented accommodation are still paying full rent regardless of whether they are currently living in their term-time homes.

Students’ Guild President Sunday Blake has said that the Guild will “still be pushing for a system where all students will get 100 percent rent refunds”.

Is Exeter a good student city?

Is Exeter expensive for students?
Cost of living

It is estimated that a single student living in Exeter or Cornwall will need approximately £1015 a month to meet basic living expenses such as accommodation, food, books and equipment and other necessities.

How many students are in Exeter?
22,540 (2017)
Is Exeter expensive to live in?
A single person estimated monthly costs are 857$ (620£) without rent. … Exeter is 30.55% less expensive than New York (without rent). Rent in Exeter is, on average, 69.98% lower than in New York.

Is Exeter posh?
Exeter is well known for being somewhat of a preppy uni. Full of the Home Counties finest, shipped down to the South West every semester in daddies Range Rover, it is easy to think of Exeter as being one of the poshest establishments going.
Is Exeter dangerous?
I wouldn’t class any neighborhood as being dangerous in Exeter. … No city is totally safe, and nasty stuff still happens rarely, but Exeter is one of the safest cities I’ve lived in / visited.

 

The things you see on the road In Exeter    How much does a student need to live on a week?
The average student living costs are about £795 a month (or £183 a week), with our findings revealing that the Maintenance Loan often falls way short of covering students‘ living expenses. It’s probably no surprise that rent takes the biggest chunk out of the student budget.

 

 

 

COVID-19 vaccine will be given to Exeter international students in the UK

After rigorous clinical trials have been conducted, with thousands of people involved, the UK has officially become the first country in the western world to authorise a COVID-19 vaccine. The experts from the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) have taken all the necessary measures to analyse the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine’s safety, quality and effectiveness, and thankfully it is good to go.

With authorisation granted, Pfizer will deliver the vaccine to the UK as soon as possible. Fortunately for international students in the UK, the Department of Health and Social Care has confirmed that international students will “be able to access these vaccinations, just as they are able to access healthcare”.

Who is first in line to receive the vaccine?

According to a priority system devised by the UK’s Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation, care home residents and their care-givers are top priority. Next in line are the elderly over the age of 80, frontline healthcare workers, people aged over 75, then younger age groups and/or with underlying health conditions. Excluded for now are pregnant women and children under the age of 16, but vaccine trials for these groups are ongoing and planned.

The UK has officially become the first country in the western world to authorise a vaccine. Source: JOEL SAGET / AFP

The UK government has actively expressed its commitment to support international students, ensuring they will not be forgotten as the vaccine is distributed and administered. In an open letter to students, universities minister Michelle Donelan expressed the country’s gratitude to them, thanking everyone for their patience.

“I understand that international students may have additional questions as we approach the end of the 2020/21 autumn academic term. Whether you are currently at your chosen university, are studying remotely from your home country, or plan to study here in the future, I am writing to you directly to provide you with support and guidance at this challenging time,” she wrote.

Donelan’s letter focuses on the movements of international students during the festive season and new term, noting that some students may have to stay on campus at this time. “It is [the] government’s expectation that HE providers should help to ensure you are well looked after,” she said. Donelan also mentions that the government is advising international students to return to university during a period staggered over five weeks.

In light of the UK’s vaccine breakthrough, a new survey by QS has found that over a fifth (21%) of international students have said they want to bring forward their plans to study abroad and there’s no reason why they should not.

“Our borders are open for both returning and new international students wishing to study in the UK and our universities are looking forward to welcoming you to campuses in the new year,” Donelan reassures.

“We are committed to prioritising education and want to enable all students – domestic and international, current and prospective – that they can return to, or start new courses at our universities and will be able to engage in blended learning as soon as possible,” she adds.

Exeter Students What to know about returning to the UK in spring 2021

Students who were allowed to return home during the special travel window in early December will soon be returning to the UK for the new semester. The spring semester begins in January and runs through to Easter, which is typically in April. Anticipating mass travel, the UK government has released an official set of guidelines for higher learning institutions.

If you are one of the students returning to the UK, we’ve condensed what you need to know below. Bear in mind that though these are official guidelines, each university is responsible for setting the rules for its returning students. So, be sure to confirm all details of your return with your university.

When to return

The UK government advises everyone to stagger the return of students over five weeks to minimise person-to-person transmission. Practical and placement students must be prioritised; they should be returning to the UK between Jan. 4 and 24, 2020. This includes students training for allied health professions and teaching, as well as those in lab-intensive STEM programmes. Additionally, students with valid reasons to return should be allowed, for example, “students who do not have access to appropriate alternative accommodation, facilities, studying space, or that need to return for health reasons.”

Universities should have set up a reliable online learning infrastructure by now, which will allow students to begin the term from home. Students who can proceed with the course online should only return to campus between Jan. 25 and Feb. 7. This includes postgraduate taught students, students in second year onwards, new starters, other international students. Basically, the government directive is: “If you’ve returned home for winter break, you need not return to your campus accommodation until face-to-face teaching resumes.”

returning to UK

A Qatar Airways flight preparing to land at Heathrow airport in west London. Source: Adrian Dennis/AFP

You must test for COVID-19

Yes, every student crossing the border should be offered a rapid turnaround test. If you test positive, you must isolate for 10 days — even if asymptomatic — to prevent unintentionally spreading COVID-19 to your campus community. The guideline further states: “If a student has had a positive coronavirus (COVID-19) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test in the last 90 days through NHS Test and Trace and been recorded as a positive case on the national system, they do not need to be tested again.”

If you are tested via lateral flow devices, you must take the test twice — once upon your return, and again after three days. You must remain isolated until receiving two negative results. Besides that, your university should ensure that your campus is a COVID-secure environment by providing access to resources, study spaces, campus catering, as well as pastoral and study support. University officials should also be open to listening to what international students need and responding in kind.

Prepare for travel before returning to the UK

Before returning to the UK, be sure to confirm when face-to-face teaching begins, and when you are expected back on campus. You should also inform your university if you have already booked travel for dates outside your specified cohort date. Don’t worry — universities are encouraged to be flexible with international students, especially those who bought tickets before this guideline was issued.

Upon arrival in the UK, you must complete a passenger locator form and self-isolate for 10 days (unless you’re coming from a country on the travel corridor list). Universities UK has prepared a checklist for universities to follow in supporting self-isolating students. You may refer to further guidelines for entering the UK here.

UPDATE: University students are advised to stay home as campuses close in England’s third lockdown. More information here.